Granny Square Pocket Shawl Crochet Pattern

How to Crochet the Hip Granny Pocket Shawl

Happy Friday friends! Pocket shawls are all the rage this year, and everyone is talking about them. The craze started with the release of the Perfect Pocket Shawl pattern by Sonja Hood, and now there must be a few hundred pocket shawl patterns to choose from. I’m honoured that you came by to see my version of the pocket shawl – I hope you enjoy it!

This shawl is made by crocheting a long rectangle and sewing on two pockets to either end. To keep things fun and interesting, I used a variety of stitches, created stripes along the border, designed some granny square pockets, and added fringe. I chose to make my shawl a little thinner than other pocket shawls because I like the way it drapes over my shoulders. However, I’ve included instructions below to make this shawl completely customizable in length and width, so you can make one that fits you perfectly. Let’s get started!

Crochet Granny Square Pocket Shawl Pattern
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You can purchase an INEXPENSIVE Printable PDF of this pattern on Etsy HERE or Ravelry HERE! This PDF includes the complete pattern, photo tutorials, and step-by-step pictures, so you can follow along on paper, highlight and make notes. It is a total of 14 pages including the cover page.

Materials:

  • 6.0mm crochet hook
  • Scissors
  • Yarn Needle
  • Approximately 624 yds of any medium 4 worsted weight yarn, in three colours of your choice for best effect (see my yarn choice below)
  • Steamer or iron on steam setting for blocking (highly recommend)

Yarn Choice:

  • Colour A: 2 Skeins of I Love this Yarn Solids Weight 4 Medium (100% acrylic, 355 yd/ 324 m, 198 g/ 7 oz) – Light Gray (used approximately 530 yds)
  • Colour B: 1 Skein of Vanna’s Choice Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 170 yd/ 155 m, 99 g/ 3.5 oz) – Honey (used approximately 54 yds)
  • Colour C: 11 Skein of Yarn Bee Soft and Sleek Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 232 yd/ 212 m, 142 g/ 5 oz) – Blush (used approximately 40 yds)

Pin this Pocket Shawl for Later – Here!

Crochet Pocket Shawl Pattern Pinterest

Other Crochet Patterns You’ll Love:

Pattern Measurements

This shawl measures 11″ x 61″, the pockets measure 8″ x 8″, and the tassels are approximately 5.75″ in length.

*Note: We all crochet differently (tighter or looser), so check your gauge before starting this pattern, to ensure that your shawl and pockets come out to size. Gauge instructions are on pg. 2. If your gauge is too small, try using a thicker weight 4 yarn or a larger crochet hook. If your gauge is too big, try using a thinner weight 4 yarn or a smaller crochet hook.

Customizing the Size of Your Pocket Shawl

A lot of pocket shawls are made to be 18″ – 24″ wide, but I chose to make mine thinner at 11″. This pocket shawl pattern can easily be adjusted to suit your needs.

Length: This pocket shawl is worked lengthwise, which means the starting chain determines the length of the shawl. The original pattern calls for chaining 241 for a total length of 61″. If you prefer to make your shawl longer or shorter, chain an odd number until satisfied with the length of your shawl. Remember that the length will shrink after working the first row (the Moss Stitch always causes a chain to shrink); so if you are not happy with the length once you finish the first row, unravel your work and start again.

Width: This pocket shawl is worked over 33 rows for a total width of 11″. To make the shawl wider, repeat Rows 12 – 20 until satisfied with the width (each additional repeat adds 3″ to the width of the shawl). Then, begin working on Row 21. 

Note: The pattern width was chosen for optimal placement of the granny square. If you make the shawl wider, make sure to center the granny square on each end of the shawl.

Crochet Pocket Shawl Hung Up

Abbreviations:

  • St(s) – stitch(es)
  • MR – magic ring
  • Sp – space
  • Sk – skip
  • Ch – chain
  • Sl st – slip stitch
  • Sc – single crochet
  • Esc – Extended Single Crochet
  • Hdc – half double crochet
  • Dc – double crochet
  • Ps – puff stitch
  • [] – Repeat the instructions inside these brackets
  • YO – yarn over
  • Rs – right side 
  • Ws – wrong side 
  • Rnd – round

Gauge Swatch (4” x 4”): 

The final swatch should measure 4” x 4” unblocked. 

  • Ch 15
  • Row 1: Sc in third ch from hook (the 2 skipped chs count as sc and ch 1), [ch 1, sk 1 ch, sc in next ch] to end of row. Turn. <8 sc>
  • Rows 2 – 13: Ch 2 (counts as a sc and ch 1), sc in first ch-1 sp, [ch 1, sk 1 st, sc in next ch-1 sp] to end of row. The last stitch should be a sc in the beg ch-2 of Row 1. Turn. <8 sc>

Video Tutorial Links to each Stitch:

  1. Single Crochet
  2. Extended Single Crochet
  3. Half Double Crochet
  4. Double Crochet
  5. Puff Stitch

Puff Stitch Photo Tutorial:

1. YO, and insert the hook in the st.

Puff Stitch Photo Tutorial

2. YO and draw up a loop – there should be 3 loops on the hook.

Puff Stitch Photo Tutorial 2

3. Repeat Step 2, two more times in the same stitch-  there should be 7 loops on the hook.

Puff Stitch Photo Tutorial 3

4. YO and pull through the first 6 loops on the hook – there should be 2 loops remaining on the hook.

Puff Stitch Photo Tutorial 4

5. YO and pull through the last 2 loops to close the stitch.

Puff Stitch Photo Tutorial 5

Pattern:

Notes:

  1. The beginning ch of each ROW counts as a st. However, the beginning ch of each ROUND does not count as a st.
  2. The pockets are worked in the round; do not turn your work.
  3. Making a Magic Ring tutorial.
  4. Odd numbered rows are considered the RS, and even numbered rows are considered the WS. 
  5. To change colours between rows, complete the final yo of the last st of each row with the new colour. Pattern is written with the assumption that the last st before a colour change will be worked this way.
  6. Yarn is not carried throughout this pattern. After joining the new colour, drop the old colour, leave a tail, and cut the strand.

Shawl Pattern:

With Colour A, Ch 241 (or see note on customizing length on pg. 3)

Row 1 (Rs): Sc in third ch from hook (this counts as a beg ch 2 and sc), [ch 1, sk 1 ch, sc in next ch] to end of row. Turn. <121 sc + 120 ch-1 sp>

Row 2 (Ws): With Colour B, ch 2, sc in first ch-1 sp, [ch 1, sk 1 st, sc in next ch-1 sp] to end of row. The last st should be a sc in the beg ch-2 of the previous row. Turn. <121 sc + 120 ch-1 sp>

Moss Stitch Row 2

Rows 3 – 5: With Colour A, repeat Row 2.

Row 6: With Colour C, repeat Row 2.

Moss Stitch Border

Row 7: With Colour A, ch 2, esc in first ch-1 sp, [ch 1, sk 1 st, esc in next ch-1 sp] to end of row. The last st should be an esc in beg ch-2 of the previous row. Turn. <121 esc + 120 ch-1 sp>

Extended Single Crochet

Rows 8 – 11: Repeat Row 7.

Rows 12 – 13: Ch 2, hdc in first ch-1 sp, [ch 1, sk 1 st, hdc in next ch-1 sp] to end of row. The last st should be a hdc in beg ch-2 of the previous row. Turn. <121 hdc + 120 ch-1 sp>

Half Double Crochet Row

Rows 14 – 20: Repeat Row 7.

Swatch of Pocket Shawl

*To make a wider pocket shawl, continue to repeat Rows 12 – 20, until satisfied with the width. Each repeat adds approx. 3″ to the width of the shawl. Then, continue with Row 21 instructions.

Rows 21 – 22: Repeat Rows 12 – 13.

Rows 23 – 27: Repeat Row 7.

Row 28: With Colour C, repeat Row 2.

Rows 29 – 31: With Colour A, repeat Row 2.

Row 32: With Colour B, repeat Row 2.

Row 33: With Colour A, repeat Row 2. Fasten off and weave in ends! 

Pocket Pattern (Make 2):

With Colour B, make a MR.

Rnd 1: Ch 1, 12 dc in MR. Join with a sl st to first dc to close the circle. <12 dc>

Rnd 2: Ch 1, 2 dc in each st around. Join with a sl st. Fasten off. <24 dc>

Rnd 3: With Colour C, attach the yarn with a sl st in any st to start the rnd. Ch 1, [2 hdc in first st, sk 1 st, 2 hdc in next st, sk 1 st, (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in next st, sk 1 st] 4 times. Join with a sl st. Fasten off. <2 dc clusters + 2 hdc clusters on each side of the corner ch-1 sps>

With Colour A, attach yarn in sp between the dc cluster and the hdc cluster (Photo below).

Rnd 4: Ch 1, [2 dc in each sp between the clusters until the corner ch-1 sp, (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in corner ch-1 sp] 4 times. Join with a sl st. <5 dc clusters on each side of the corner ch-1 sp>

Rnd 5: Ch 1, [2 dc in each sp between the clusters until the corner ch-1 sp, (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in corner ch-1 sp] 4 times. Join with a sl st. <6 dc clusters on each side of the corner ch-1 sp>

Rnd 6: Ch 1, hdc in first 10 sts, (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in corner ch-1 sp, [hdc in next 12 sts, (2 hdc, ch 1, 2 hdc) in corner ch-1 sp] 3 times, hdc in next 2 sts. Join with a sl st. <16 hdc on each side of the corner ch-1 sp>

*Make a sl st in the next st to move one st over before starting Rnd 7.

Rnd 7: Ch 1, Ps in first st, [ch 1, sk 1 st, Ps in next st] 5 times; ch 1, (Ps, ch 1, Ps, ch 1) in corner ch-1 sp. {[Ps in next st, ch 1, sk 1 st] 7 times, Ps in next st, ch 1, (Ps, ch 1, Ps, ch 1) in corner ch-1 sp} 2 times, Ps in next st, ch 1, sk 1 st, Ps in next st, ch 1, sk 1 st. Join with a sl st. <10 Ps on each side of the corner ch-1 sp>

Note: In Rnd 8, both the Ps and the ch-1 sps from Rnd 7, count as sts. 

Rnd 8: Ch 1, sc in first 13 sts, (2 sc, ch 1, 2 sc) in corner ch-1 sp, [sc in next 19 sts, (2 sc, ch 1, 2 sc) in corner ch-1 sp] 3 times, sc in next 6 sts. Join with a sl st. <23 sc on each side of the corner ch-1 sp>

Fasten off and weave in ends!

Repeat this process once more to make a total of 2 pockets!

Blocking Your Work!

Blocking your work is always optional, but I highly recommend it for this pocket shawl. If you’ve never blocked your work before, or you’re unsure of what it means to “block” something, let’s dive in. Blocking your work is done by wetting or steaming a crochet piece, which allows the stitches to relax, stretch out, and lie flat. Blocking will help to improve the drape of your shawl, and straighten out your pockets.

How to Block Your Pocket Shawl

I’ve tried a few different ways of blocking, but my go-to method is to use a steamer or an iron on a steam setting. Simply lay your piece flat or vertically (depending on how your steamer works) and move the steamer/iron over your work. Make sure that the steamer/iron is at least 2 inches away from your work. Pull on your piece to straighten it out, and let it dry.

If you don’t have a steamer or iron, you can use straight pins to stretch and straighten out your work, before lightly spraying it with water. Allow the piece to dry overnight or wait 24 hours before unpinning it.

Sewing on Your Pockets

To sew on the pockets, we will be using the running stitch. Here is a video tutorial to help you. 

  • Make sure that the pocket and shawl are facing right side up. 
  • Place the pocket at one end of the shawl, in the center, between the borders.
  • With the yarn needle threaded, insert it from the back of the shawl out through the front of the pocket, over one stitch, then out the front of the pocket to the back of the shawl (See Picture 2, 3, 4). Begin the running stitch along the 3 sides of the pocket indicated in Picture 1. Make sure to weave through both the pocket and the shawl to attach them effectively!
  • Repeat this process once more to attach the second pocket to the other end of the shawl.
Attaching a Crochet Pocket

Adding Fringe to the Pocket Shawl

Adding fringe to your pocket shawl is a personal preference, so if you’d rather not add any, that’s totally fine! I thought the fringe added a touch of boho to this pocket shawl. I made the fringe about 5.75″ in length, and added it to every other row at each end of the pocket shawl. So I had a total of 17 tassels at each end.

  • Step 1: Each tassel is made of 3 strands that are approximately 11.5″ long. Cut 3, 11.5″ long strands.
  • Step 2: Fold the 3 strands in half to create a loop on one side. Insert the loop end into the first row at one end of the shawl.
  • Step 3: Reach your fingers through the loop and pull the 3 strands through the loop. This creates a knot. Pull the strands tight to close the tassel and secure it to the shawl.
  • Step 4: With a pair of scissors, trim the tassel to make the strands straight.

Repeat this process 16 more times, making sure that the tassels are added to every other row. Once you finish one side, repeat this process along the other end of your shawl!

Your Pocket Shawl is Complete!

Congratulations! You’ve just finished your first Hip Granny Pocket Shawl. I hope you enjoyed making it as much as I did.

Check out some more fun and budget-friendly crochet patterns on the blog.

Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you’ve made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates).

As always, thank you guys so much for following along with me! I love seeing what you create with my patterns, so please tag me in any posts you share.

I hope you all have an amazing day!

Love, Dayna

8 thoughts on “How to Crochet the Hip Granny Pocket Shawl”

  1. Well I started a shawl this week, however, I’ve changed my mind after seeing this one !!! I LOVE IT !!! So excited to get started now!

  2. Yep. This is the ‘pocket shawl’ that I am going to crank out for myself. I have all the yarn stashed in my Sponge Bob laundry basket . I just need to dig around to the bottom . Your pattern is easy to convert to someone like me who is 4’10” without the bulk. I like the nice touch of the pockets with a contrasting color to fasten to the shawl. I would leave off the fringe and do a few rows in the darker color to finish off. I can tell already that my neighbor is going to ask me to make her one too.
    Thank you for the pattern.

    1. Hi Wendy, I’m so glad you’re going to make this pocket shawl (and maybe one for your neighbor too haha). I can’t wait to see how they turn out for you! 🙂

      P.S. I love that you have your yarn stashed in a Sponge Bob basket – mine is just in plain, boring canvas bins haha.

      Sincerely,
      Dayna

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